Topics: Events: North West

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1805 - view

Men in fringe camps sometimes agree to guide punitive expeditions against Aboriginal people on the basis that they will be permitted to take women after their men are killed

1805 - view

ergeant Obadiah Ikin lived peacefully with local Aborigal people. After the massacre, he sells his land

1808 - view

Governor Macquarie ’s leadership (1810-1822). He arrives in 1810 and creates new positions including Andrew Thompson as the Hawkesbury’s Justice of the Peace and Magistrate

1814 - view

Six year old Maria from Richmond Hill is educated there. Maria remains at the Institution until she is 14

1816 - view

make“gorgets or breast plates with chains for native chiefs”

1816 - view

Aborigines are designated “king” rather than merely “chief”

1816 - view

Governor Macquarie ’s administration grants land

1816 - view

Betty Fulton and Milbah are captured during the Appin Massacre

1816 - view

Their land became the “infant settlement” at “the black town” on Richmond Road, later renamed Plumpton

1816 - view

Governor Macquarie issues a Proclamation forbidding Aborigines to carry offensive weapons within proximity of white settlement

1816 - view

Bidgee Bidgee and Harry , Nurragingy and Colebee , act as guides. As their reward, the latter two receive land grants on the Richmond Road, which become “the Black Town”

1816 - view

Captain James Wallis arrives as third Commandant in Newcastle two months after he commanded his 46th Regiment against Aboriginals near Airds and Appin and received the thanks of Governor Lachlan Macquarie for his “zealous exertions and strict attention to the fulfilling of the instructions”

1816 - view

A large number of warriors hurling their spears makes clear that they intend to repulse the Europeans from the mouth of the Hunter River

1816 - view

The “black Natives [are] living now peaceably and quietly in every part of the colony, unmolested by the white inhabitants”

1817 - view

He establishes a punt to ferry travellers

1817 - view

passes through many fires burning on ridgelines. He blames this obstructive behaviour on the Mellon natives behind and the Hawkesbury natives ahead

1818 - view

The first land grant follows in the early 1820s

1818 - view

He tries to convert some of them to Christianity so they will “go to heaven if they die”. This includes “The old King, Yellowmonday” . They laugh at him and walk away

1818 - view

Aboriginal boy named Wallace is taken from Newcastle by Captain James Wallis and is placed in the Parramatta Native Institution

1818 - view

Captain Wallis of the 46th Regiment who had commanded the grenadiers against Aboriginal people (Gundungurra) in 1816. Following his “zealous exertions” in the punitive expedition, he is appointed by Governor Macquarie to relieve Lieutenant Thompson as Commandant at Newcastle