Topics: Events: North West

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1838 - view

The Myall Creek Massacre and the trials of most of the perpetrators mark a devolution of burden of colonial security and punitive expeditions against Aboriginal people from the control of the British garrison to that of settlers and local police

1838 - view

a response by Bishop Broughton is worth noting : he disapproves of mixed marriages on the grounds that the Aborigines are unbelievers

1838 - view

They include the forced removal of Gooris onto mission stations or reserves such as at Karuah and St. Clair (Singleton)

1839 - view

Lt Charles Wilkes donates this cloak to the Smithsonian Institute in Washington

1839 - view

Their sentence is commuted to two years labour in irons on Coal Island in Sydney Harbour, where they are to be kept in isolation and employed in stone cutting

1839 - view

The Wolombi police establishment includes a clerk of court, chief constable, district constable, eight ordinary constables, two watch house [gaol] keepers and a scourger (whipping man)

1839 - view

Myall Creek massacre of 1838, Eliza was outraged by these atrocities. She wrote the lament “The Aboriginal Mother”. This poem is remarkable for her use of Aboriginal words

1839 - view

one living with him although 30 came to the mission

1839 - view

a “young, conceited, self-complacent gentleman” who with “extreme loquacity” advocated summarily flogging “of the blacks without trial”

1840 - view

“Little Breeches” assists to track and capture a gang of bushrangers

1840 - view

Native Police inquiry

1840 - view

“William Bird, the Aboriginal “Squatter”, the news feature poses the question: should such a man be refused to purchase land because he is an “Aboriginal native”?

1840 - view

prevent white men taking Aboriginal women from their own people by “force, fraud and bribery”

1840 - view

Threlkeld records the language spoken by the “Aborigines in the vicinity of Hunter River, Lake Macquarie etc”. He prints some of them during 1850

1840 - view

He and several other Aborigines were arraigned for burglary

1840 - view

“stand my punishment as a man of honor, though I have done no wrong”

1840 - view

Boney worked and received rations at “Lilburndale” near Sackville Reach during July 1883

1840 - view

He was buried in Rookwood Cemetery

1840 - view

He favoured me several times with his company, and perhaps thought it an honor when he made proposals to me for the matrimonial alliance with one of the members of my family

1841 - view

Some “natives enquire most anxiously for their blankets” at Stroud. Dungog Magistrate, Thomas Cook , expresses fear that the large number of Aboriginal people in the district – who are without exception quiet and harmless – will get “discontented”