Topics: Events

Topic tags allow you to gather information from different pages on a particular topic. The first page, which appears when you click on the topic tag, shows relevant information from all place pages. The list of places will also appear on the right-hand side menu. You can display topic tags related to the particular place by clicking on the place name.

1827 - North West - view

first census of Darkinjung people in the Brisbane Waters district

1827 - North West - view

Aborigines begin to depend on government issued blankets and rations as settlers occupy their lands. This not only prevents them from traditional food gathering and hunting, but also the making of animal skin coats

1827 - North West - view

A number of these homesteads also become an important area of employment for Aboriginal people in the pastoral industry: Invermain at Scone, Segenoe at Scone, Merton at Denman, and Glendon at Singleton

1827 - North West - view

In April, records are completed for the 1828 Census. Approximately 40,000 Europeans occupy the “settled districts” of NSW and approximately 3,000 Aboriginal people are counted

1827 - North West - view

Of the total of 2,979 Aboriginal people recorded as living in “settled districts” in NSW during 1827, nearly half live in the wider Hunter region (approximately 1,412)

1828 - North West - view

Surveyor and pastoralist, Henry Dangar completes his map of Newcastle

1828 - North West - view

Bean relates that from late-1827 “many strange tribes had appeared in the district and destroyed the settlers’ crops”. The District Constable dealt with the disturbances by “arming fifteen men and pursuing the Aborigines”

1828 - North West - view

200 Aborigines, mostly strangers, suddenly arrive on his property and make off with his potato crop. Aborigines again troubled the settlers, pilfering and destroying crops, and even threatening lives

1828 - North West - view

This District has within the last five or six months been greatly disturbed by the inroads of Strange Tribes of Aborigines, I believe from the Hunter’s River, The Wollombi and the Sugar Loaf – These tribes have frequently…assembled in great number (on one occasion upwards of 200 & on another 180)

1828 - North West - view

The Aborigines whose normal sources of food had dwindled soon develop a taste for corn meal. In helping themselves they are soon in conflict with the farmers and their servants

1828 - North West - view

Aborigines “have speared many an Englishman, but not unprovoked”

1828 - West - view

Windsor and Richmond Gazette reported

1828 - North West - view

“The Attorney General…asked my opinion if it would be beneficial, to bring Lieut Lowe to trial for shooting a Black. I urged him not as [if] he was removed this would satisfy the Blacks and the other would only exasperate the Settlers more

1828 - North West - view

The whole of the outrages may be traced to this…Many lives will be lost on both sides and the Blacks threaten to Burn the Corn

1828 - North West - view

A warrant is issued for the capture of Melville and Harry for alleged murders of Europeans at Glendon

1828 - North West - view

He later resigned his office as a Wesleyan Missionary on the grounds that he could see no possible means of prosecuting the Mission

1828 - North Coastal - view

Magistrate Willoughby Bean reports incidents between Aborigines and settlers.The district had within the last 5 to 6 months been greatly disturbed by the inroads of several tribes of Aborigines, I believe from the Hunter River, the Wollombi and the Sugar Loaf. These tribes have frequently assembled in great numbers (upwards of 200) and they have destroyed the settlers’ crops … Mr Henderson, the district Constable … deemed it prudent to arm 15 men from home and to go in pursuit of them. He overtook and drove them before him along the coast to the northward till night came on, when they doubled upon him and returned. He took two of them home and released them some days. They confessed that it was their intention not only to rob the settlers but likewise to capture and burn the gentleman of the name Cape who had fired upon them … during the stealing of his corn.

1828 - North West - view

Melville, Harry and Bulwarra are ordered to surrender. They raise a “war whoop” and shower the policing party with spears

1828 - North West - view

Aboriginal people are adapting to changing social, economic and cultural conditions. They begin to “come in” to live and work on or near homesteads on or near their traditional lands

1829 - North West - view

Numerous properties start to grow grapes and produce wine